8 Feb 2019

7 PM

Venue
Ngee Ann Auditorium
Basement Level
1 Empress Place
Singapore 179555
Admission

This lecture is free.
Seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis.
No registration is required.

Italian Jesuit painter Giovanni Cola founded an “art academy” or “art seminary” (Seminario dos pintores) in Nagasaki around 1590. The students of this art school produced numerous paintings, including secular ones that show they knew about Western painting techniques. Because of the persecution of Christians in Japan, Cola and some of his pupils were forced to flee to Macau in 1614, where he died 12 years later. Artworks from his school remain not only in Japan and Macau, but also in Manila. Just like Macau and Nagasaki, Manila was an important Catholic center in East Asia during that period. Western missionaries frequently moved between Macau, Manila, and Nagasaki, as there was significant commercial exchange between these three cities at the time. The Christian missionary art travelled in that pre-existing network of exchange.

In this lecture, Yoshie Kojima will discuss the painting of the Archangel St Michael holding a monstrance, in the Museum of St Paul’s Ruins, Macau; the Madonna of the Rosary in Saint Augustine’s, Manila; and several other significant religious paintings in Japan.

About the speaker
Yoshie Kojima (BA and MA, History of Art, Waseda University, Tokyo; PhD, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, Italy) is currently a Professor at the Department of Art History of Waseda University of Tokyo. Until 2017, she was an Associate Professor at the Department of History of Sophia University of Tokyo. Her main areas of research are the reception of Western art in Japan and its transformation during the 16th through 19th century, and the Romanesque and Gothic art of northern Italy. Her numerous publications include “Jesuits art in Asia: The Virgin Mary of Scipione Pulzone in Japan and India” (in Japanese, 2018), “The Madonna of Snow of Nagasaki and Sicily: Catholic Reformation art in Japan” (in Japanese, 2015), “Sacred Images of Hidden Christians of Ikitsuki Island in Japan” (in Japanese, 2014), “Reproduction of the Image of Madonna Salus Populi Romani in Japan,” in Between East and West: Reproductions in Art (2014), and the book Storia di una cattedrale: il Duomo di San Donnino a Fidenza (Pisa 2006).


This lecture is free. Seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. No registration is required.


Image: St Michael the Archangel holding a monstrance (detail). Disciple of Giovanni Cola. Museum of St Paul’s Ruins, Macau.
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